Friday, July 17, 2020

17 July Lecture on Facebook

Join my Online classes 

COSMOS :AN INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENGLISH LITERATURE, LANGUAGE AND INDIC STUDIES, JAIPUR. 

Run by ๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ‘‡

๐ŸŽฏDr Mukesh Pareek 

๐ŸŽฏExpert of Experts in NET Coaching 

๐ŸŽฏ14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

๐Ÿ“žContact for online classes 9828402032



The Poema Morale, or as it was called by 19th-century scholars, 'A Moral Ode', was composed in the last quarter of the 12th century by an unknown author, who lets his narrator survey a long life and  regret his shortcomings deploring the waste of opportunities and recommending righteous and holy living. Finally, he describes the Last Judgement and the Joys of Heaven. Thus, the poem clearly stands in the homiletic tradition of the period, but it reveals at the same time a sincere personal element in that the persona, a wise old man, wishes others to profit from his experience.

The poem is written in about 200 septenary rhymed couplets, a Latin verse form of lines of seven stresses with a caesura after the fourth. Poema Morale is the first known example of the septenary in English.

Join my Online classes 

Dr Mukesh Pareek 

Expert of Experts in NET Coaching 

14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

Contact for online classes 9828402032

The poem must have enjoyed a certain popularity as it is preserved in at least seven manuscripts dating from 1180 to 1300. Most modern critics praise the poem's formal qualities and neglect its contents. Nevertheless, there is good reason to read the Poema Morale in its own right and to understand it in the tradition of Old English admonitory pieces, such as Be Domes Dรฆge or Precepts.



The Poema Morale ("Conduct of life" or "Moral Ode") is an early Middle English moral poem outlining proper Christian conduct. The poem was popular enough to have survived in seven manuscripts, including the homiletic collections known as the Lambeth Homilies and Trinity Homilies, both dating from around 1200.

Content and form

The narrator, a wise, old man, reflects on his life and his many failures; the homily ends with a description of the Last Judgment and the joys of heaven. Both personal sin and collective guilt (scholars have compared the narrator's stance to that of the Peterborough Chronicler) are of concern.

Join my Online classes 

Dr Mukesh Pareek 

Expert of Experts in NET Coaching 

14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

Contact for online classes 9828402032

The poem is sometimes referred to as a sermon,sometimes as a homiletic narrative.It contains, in its longest version, 200 rhymed couplets.

The lengths of the different versions of the poem vary greatly: the shortest is 270, the longest 400 lines; different manuscript versions also differ in wording. The Lambeth version is considered the oldest.In fact, there is so much "metrical, lexical and scribal variation" that it seems there is no "correct" version: "each copy represents a reshaping within an established rhythmical and metrical structure."

Join my Online classes 

Dr Mukesh Pareek 

Expert of Experts in NET Coaching 

14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

Contact for online classes 9828402032



Harrowing of Hell is a doctrine in Christian theology, derived from biblical exegesis and found in the Apostles' Creed and the Athanasian Creed, which states that Jesus descended into Hell before being resurrected in order to visit the realm of the dead to save those who came before his earthly ministry. In this way, the taint of Original Sin was remedied for the dead, which allowed Jesus to defeat Satan and throw open the doors of Hades for all eternity, allowing the souls of the faithful to ascend to Heaven.


Join my Online classes 

Dr Mukesh Pareek 

Expert of Experts in NET Coaching 

14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

Contact for online classes 9828402032

The "Harrowing of Hell" doctrine was especially popular among the laity, as it provided a concrete image of salvation that was easily encapsulated in religious iconography (which was often their only point of entry into such discourse). It also provided a popular understanding of the atonement (the process of salvation) in the early Church

Join my Online classes 

Dr Mukesh Pareek 

Expert of Experts in NET Coaching 

14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

Contact for online classes 9828402032


Apocrypha are works, usually written, of unknown authorship or of doubtful origin. Biblical apocrypha are a set of texts included in the Septuagint and Latin Vulgate but not in the Hebrew Bible. While Catholic tradition considers some of these texts to be deuterocanonical, Protestants consider them apocryphal. Thus, Protestant bibles do not include the books within the Old Testament but have sometimes included them in a separate section, usually called the Apocrypha. Other non-canonical apocryphal texts are generally called pseudepigrapha, a term that means "false attribution".

The word's origin is the Medieval Latin adjective apocryphus, "secret, or non-canonical", from the Greek adjective แผ€ฯ€ฯŒฮบฯฯ…ฯ†ฮฟฯ‚ (apokryphos), "obscure", from the verb แผ€ฯ€ฮฟฮบฯฯฯ€ฯ„ฮตฮนฮฝ (apokryptein), "to hide away".


Join my Online classes 

Dr Mukesh Pareek 

Expert of Experts in NET Coaching 

14 NET, 3 JRF, 2 M. Phil 

Contact for online classes 9828402032


The Sun Rising 

               Busy old fool, unruly sun,
               Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains call on us?
Must to thy motions lovers' seasons run?
               Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide
               Late school boys and sour prentices,
         Go tell court huntsmen that the king will ride,
         Call country ants to harvest offices,
Love, all alike, no season knows nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

               Thy beams, so reverend and strong
               Why shouldst thou think?
I could eclipse and cloud them with a wink,
But that I would not lose her sight so long;
               If her eyes have not blinded thine,
               Look, and tomorrow late, tell me,
         Whether both th' Indias of spice and mine
         Be where thou leftst them, or lie here with me.
Ask for those kings whom thou saw'st yesterday,
And thou shalt hear, All here in one bed lay.

               She's all states, and all princes, I,
               Nothing else is.
Princes do but play us; compared to this,
All honor's mimic, all wealth alchemy.
               Thou, sun, art half as happy as we,
               In that the world's contracted thus.
         Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be
         To warm the world, that's done in warming us.
Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere;
This bed thy center is, these walls, thy sphere.


No comments:

Post a Comment

join my telegram Channel group for NET JRF

Dr. Mukesh Pareek(15 NET,3JRF) Contact me for Online NET Classes and Study Material 9828402032 A Channel of future Professors of English Lit...